Listen to the recording and choose the best answer to each question. To make this practice more like the real test, cover the questions and answers during each conversation.

Questions 1 through 3. Listen to part of a conversation in a university office.

W: Hello. Is this where I can get a scholarship application?

M: Yes. Which scholarship are you applying for?

W: Oh … um, there are three that I’m interested in.

M: Okay. Each scholarship has its own requirements. For every one, there’s a form to fill out. Some of them require recommendations from faculty or a list of references—

W: Uh–huh.

M: —and some require an essay.

W: Oh, great … my favorite thing.

M: Sorry?

W: Oh, nothing. Well, here’s the list of the scholarships I’m applying for.

M: Okay. Let me get you those packets.

W: Thanks. What kind of essay do they want?

M: Oh, usually it’s a general statement about what your goals are, you know, and how your program of study will help you achieve those goals. That lets the scholarship committee understand more about you.

W: That sounds easy enough.

M: There’s nothing hard about it. You don’t even have to write a different essay for each application.

W: But didn’t you just say that each one has different requirements?

M: They do, but they’re all pretty similar. All of them want to know the same things about you. You can write a basic statement about your goals and then vary it a little for each individual application.

W: Do you think that would be enough?

M: Oh, sure. One thing I would say, though, is you should get your applications in early. You’ll go crazy if you wait until the last minute. If an essay isn’t required, write one anyway and attach it to your application.

W: Really? Do you think I should?

M: It can’t hurt.

  1. Listen again to part of the conversation. Then answer the question.

“Okay. Each scholarship has its own requirements. For every one, there’s a form to fill out. Some of them require recommendations from faculty or a list of references—”

“Uh–huh.”

“—and some require an essay.”

“Oh, great … my favorite thing.”

What can be inferred about the woman?

  1. Listen again to part of the conversation. Then answer the question.

“There’s nothing hard about it. You don’t even have to write a different essay for each application.”

“But didn’t you just say that each one has different requirements?”

What does the woman mean?

  1. Listen again to part of the conversation. Then answer the question.

“If an essay isn’t required, write one anyway and attach it to your application.”

“Really? Do you think I should?”

“It can’t hurt.”

What does the man imply?


Questions 4 through 6. Listen to a conversation between a student and a professor.

M: Excuse me, Dr. Kline. Do you have a minute?

W: Hello, Daniel. Come on in. What can I do for you?

M: It’s about my midterm grade. I … I’m surprised it’s so low. I work hard. I, uh, spend a lot of time studying.

W: Oh. Well, let’s have a look at your assignments … here we go. Okay, I’ve pulled up your record. Hmm … you had a “C” on the midterm exam and a “B” on your first paper. But unfortunately, I don’t haveanything here for the second and third papers.

M: I know … I’ve been sort of busy. My younger brother’s starting classes here in January, and I have to show him around and help him find a place to live. He’s staying with me for now, but he doesn’t have a car, so I have to drive him everywhere.

W: Does your brother know about the bus system?

M: Uh, it’s kind of a problem. My parents want me to help him get settled.

W: I see. That does make it tough for you.

M: Would it be all right if I made up those two assignments? I started one of them, but I didn’t have time to finish typing it.

W: Yes, of course you can make up the work, but you need to do that as soon as possible. Remember, these short papers, together with the term paper, count for 50 percent of your final grade.

M: I know. Don’t worry. I’ll get it together.

W: Okay then.

M: Thanks, Dr. Kline. I appreciate your time.

  1. Why does the student speak to his professor?
  2. Listen again to part of the conversation. Then answer the question.

“I know … I’ve been sort of busy. My younger brother’s starting classes here in January, and I have to show him around and help him find a place to live. He’s staying with me for now, but he doesn’t have a car, so I have to drive him everywhere.”

“Does your brother know about the bus system?”

What does the professor imply when she says this:

“Does your brother know about the bus system?”

  1. Why does the student say this:
    “Don’t worry. I’ll get it together.”

Questions 1 through 3. Listen to part of a lecture in a botany class.

W1: There are many variations in the size, shape, and color of flowers. Before we go on, let’s quickly go over the parts of a flower. In a perfect, idealized flower, its four organs are arranged in four whorls, all attached to the receptacle at the end of the stem. Closest to the stem are the sepals, which look like leaves because they’re usually green. Next are the petals, the colorful layers of the flower, which make the flower attractive to insects and birds. And then, inside the petals, we have the stamens and the sepals, the flower’s reproductive parts. So, to sum up— uh … yes?

W2: Excuse me, Professor Dryden, but … uh … is that … uh … are you sure about that?

W1: Sure about …?

W2: I thought you said that the sepals were outside the petals, not inside.

W1: Yes, they are. Oh, sorry, I believe I misspoke. Thank you for noticing. Yes, the sepals are outside the petals. Inside, it’s the stamens and the carpels. Okay. To sum up, the four parts of a flower are the sepals, the petals, the stamens, and the carpels. All right now, moving on … during the millions of years in the history of flowering plants, numerous variations evolved. One important element in plant classification is the arrangement of flowers on their stalks. For example, members of the composite family, which includes sunflowers, have flower heads that form a central disk made up of hundreds of tiny, complete flowers, and the so–called petals surrounding the disk are actually imperfect flowers called ray flowers.

M: Professor Dryden?

W1: Yes, Matthew?

M: So what you’re saying is … a single sunflower is really a lot of little flowers put together?

W1: The flower head consists of hundreds of tiny, tightly packed complete flowers that stand upright on a flat disk. The petals—what look like petals—are actually larger flowers called rays that extend out from the rim. Does that help?

M: Uh, I guess so.

W1: This will make more sense in the lab this afternoon.

  1. Listen again to part of the discussion. Then answer the question.
    “And then, inside the petals, we have the stamens and the sepals, the flower’s reproductive parts. So, to sum up— uh … yes?”
    “Excuse me, Professor Dryden, but … uh … is that … uh … are you sure about that?”
    “Sure about …?”

Why does the student say this:

“…are you sure about that?”

  1. Why does the professor say this:
    “Okay. To sum up, the four parts of a flower are the sepals, the petals, the stamens, and the carpels. All right now, moving on …”
  2. Listen again to part of the discussion. Then answer the question.
    “The flower head consists of hundreds of tiny, tightly packed complete flowers that stand upright on a flat disk. The petals—what look like petals—are actually larger flowers called rays that extend out from the rim. Does that help?”
    “Uh, I guess so.”
    “This will make more sense in the lab this afternoon.”

What does the professor imply when she says this:

“This will make more sense in the lab this afternoon.”


Questions 4 through 6. Listen to part of a talk in a sociology class.

M1: Culture consists of the beliefs, values, rituals, symbols, and norms of a society. Norms are the “rules” that maintain social order. Some norms tell us how to behave—for example, that we should obey authority and treat others with respect. Some norms are traditions or customs, such as clothing styles. Speaking of clothing … that reminds me of a place where I used to work. It was my first job after college. It was a big corporation, an investment bank, and the uniform was the traditional dark suit, white shirt, and striped tie. Anyway, that dress code is a good example of a cultural norm. In this case, the dark suit and striped tie symbolized the culture of the organization. Yes, Kayla?

W: What were some other things that identified the culture? I mean, besides the suit and tie.

M1: Good question! In the bank, there were definite norms of behavior. Office conduct was formal. Business hours were standard. Generally speaking, it was a well–established company with a traditional corporate culture. A person’s rank was signified by the suit he wore and the size and location of his office. A corner office was a sign of a higher status. There were also rituals, like the executive fishing trip, which brought people together to celebrate corporate unity.

M2: The place where my mother works has a company song, and everyone has to learn it. They sing it at
parties and award ceremonies. They also have company colors that everyone wears at these parties, so this means my mother has a lot of blue and gold outfits.

W: You’re kidding! Really?

M2: It’s a good thing my mother likes those colors.

M1: The company colors are like the flag of any nation, and the company song is a good example of a
corporate text. As in any society, these things define the whole group.

W: My brother works for a technology company, and the culture there is very laid–back. Everyone goes to
work in blue jeans. They come and go as they please. They even bring their pets to work. My brother brings his dog to work.

M1: That’s a good example of an informal workplace culture where there are no fixed traditions to follow.
I’m sure you can all think of other examples that you know.

  1. Why does the professor say this:
    “Some norms are traditions or customs, such as clothing styles. Speaking of clothing … that reminds me of a place where I used to work. It was my first job after college.”
  2. Listen again to part of the discussion. Then answer the question.
    “They also have company colors that everyone wears at these parties, so this means my mother has a lot of blue and gold outfits.”
    “You’re kidding! Really?”
    “It’s a good thing my mother likes those colors.”

Why does the woman say this:

“You’re kidding! Really?”

  1. Listen again to part of the discussion. Then answer the question.
    “My brother works for a technology company, and the culture there is very laid–back. Everyone goes to work in blue jeans. They come and go as they please. They even bring their pets to work. My brother brings his dog to work.”
    “That’s a good example of an informal workplace culture where there are no fixed traditions to follow.”

Why does the professor say this:

“That’s a good example of an informal workplace culture where there are no fixed traditions to follow.”

Extension

1 Listen again to the conversations in Exercise 2.5.A above. With your classmates, discuss the meaning of the underlined expressions in the script below. In what other situations might these expressions be used?
fill out For every one, there’s a form to fill out.
Let me Okay. Let me get you those packets.
go crazy You’ll go crazy if you wait until the last minute.
It can’t hurt It can’t hurt.
pull up Okay, I’ve pulled up your record.
show someone around …I have to show him around and help him find a place to live.
get settled My parents want me to help him get settled.
get it together Don’t worry. I’ll get it together.
2 With your teacher and classmates, discuss various ways that people use English to serve the functions in the list below. What expressions do speakers use? Are these expressions formal or informal? Are there contexts in which any of the expressions would not be appropriate?
  • Signal a change of topic
  • Signal the end of a conversation
  • Point out a mistake
  • Express surprise
  • Express disbelief
  • Express disagreement

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