There are six questions in this quiz. You may take notes, and you may use your notes to help prepare your responses. Record your responses. Each response will earn a score of 1, 2, 3, or 4, with 4 the highest score. Add the six scores to obtain your total score.

Time – approximately 20 minutes

At the bottom of the page you will find the audio transcripts. At the real TOEFL iBT test, you do not have access to the transcripts. We’re including them here so you can learn from them, but you should look at them after you complete the tasks.


Question 1

In this question, you will be asked to talk about a familiar topic. After you hear the question, you will have 15 seconds to prepare your response and 45 seconds to speak.

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What book have you read that you would recommend to others? Explain why you think other people should read this book. Include details and examples to support your explanation.

Preparation Time:    15 seconds
Response Time:        
 45 seconds


Question 2

In this question, you will be asked to give your opinion about a familiar topic. After you hear the question, you will have 15 seconds to prepare your response and 45 seconds to speak.

Get your timer ready!

Click to hear and see Question 2.

Some people have a few favorite foods that they eat most of the time. Others are always trying new dishes and styles of cooking. Which do you prefer and why? Include details and examples in your explanation.

Preparation Time:    15 seconds
Response Time:        
 45 seconds

Question 3

In this question, you will read a short passage about a campus situation, listen to a conversation, and then speak in response to a question about what you have read and heard. After you hear the question, you have 30 seconds to prepare your response and 60 seconds to speak.

Read the following announcement from the dean’s office.

Reading Time – 45 seconds

PROPOSAL TO LIMIT STUDENT COURSE LOAD

The dean’s office has proposed placing a limit on the number of credit hours for which students are allowed to register in a term. Currently, there is no limit on how many credits a student may pursue in a single semester. The proposal would impose a maximum course load per semester of 20 credit hours, with 12 to 20 credit hours indicating full–time status. This proposal comes in response to an increase in the number of students with heavy loads who either withdraw from courses or do not complete courses. The dean will speak about the proposal on Wednesday at 12:30 p.m. in Lecture Hall 2.

Now close the passage and listen to the recording. When you hear the question, begin preparing your response.

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The woman expresses her opinion about the proposal. State her opinion and explain the reasons she gives for holding that opinion.

Preparation Time:    30 seconds
Response Time:        
 60 seconds


Question 4

In this question, you will read a short passage about a campus situation, listen to a conversation, and then speak in response to a question about what you have read and heard. After you hear the question, you have 30 seconds to prepare your response and 60 seconds to speak.

Read the following information from a textbook.

Reading Time – 50 seconds

COEVOLUTION

Coevolution is the joint evolution of two species that are dependent on each other. Each species influences the other, so they evolve at the same time. Coevolution is a result of complex interactions involving mutual evolutionary changes. A change in one species acts as a selective force on another species, which adapts in response. The adaptation in the second species, in turn, is a selective force on the first species. Hence, the two species trade adaptations and evolve together. Coevolution often occurs when both species receive a benefit, such as a higher rate of survival.

Now close the passage and listen to the recording. When you hear the question, begin preparing your response.

Get your timer ready!

speaking_quiz_7_image_q4

Click to see Question 4.

Use the examples from the lecture to examples from the lecture to explain the concept of coevolution.

Preparation Time:    30 seconds
Response Time:        
 60 seconds

Question 5

In this question, you will listen to a conversation. You will then be asked to talk about the information in the conversation and to give your opinion about the ideas presented. After you hear the question, you have 20 seconds to prepare your response and 60 seconds to speak.

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The speakers discuss possible solutions to the man’s problem. Briefly describe the problem. Then state which solution you prefer and explain why.

Preparation Time:    20 seconds
Response Time:        
 60 seconds

Question 6

In this question, you will listen to part of a lecture. You will then be asked to summarize important information from the lecture. After you hear the question, you have 20 seconds to prepare your response and 60 seconds to speak.

Get your timer ready!

Click to see Question 6.

Using points and examples from the lecture, explain the three main ways that manufacturers sell goods to consumers.

Preparation Time:    20 seconds
Response Time:        
 60 seconds Do not look at the transcripts until after you finish the tasks.

Now listen to two students as they discuss the proposal.

W: Have you heard about the proposal to limit our course load?

M: Yeah. But I don’t really see why it’s necessary.

W: I don’t either. So what if people want to take more than 20 credits? I’ve done it twice already, and I never had any problem finishing the work. It’s hard, I mean you’re working all the time, but if you manage your time well, you can do it.

M: It’s not something I’d want to do, but I can see your point.

W: Actually, this proposal is kind of a problem for me because I need only 21 more credits to graduate. I was hoping to graduate this spring. If I’m only allowed to take 20 credits, that makes it impossible for me to graduate. I’d have to go to summer school.

M: Oh, that’s too bad.

W: And if I take a class this summer, that’s more tuition I have to pay. I don’t want to ask my family for any more money. So this new policy causes a financial problem for me. I think I’ll go hear the dean speak, but I also have some tough questions to ask her.

The woman expresses her opinion about the proposal. State her opinion and explain the reasons she gives for holding that opinion.

Now listen to part of a lecture in a biology class.

Coevolution can be seen in the interaction between insects and flowering plants. Certain insects pollinate certain flowers, and both species benefit. The insect gets food, and the plant gets pollinated. In turn, the flower evolves features to attract that insect, and the insect evolves features to best fit that flower. It’s a beautiful arrangement.

Some flowers evolve a particular shape in order to benefit a particular pollinator. Flowers that are pollinated by moths often have spurs or tubes the exact length of a certain moth’s“tongue.” One example is the yucca flower. These flowers have evolved a certain shape so that only the tiny yucca moth can pollinate them. The moth lays its eggs in the yucca flower, and the moth larvae live inside the developing flower, where they eat the yucca seeds.

Another example is the common snapdragon that many people plant in their gardens. The snapdragon evolved along with a particular bee. The flower has an irregular shape with a landing platform. Only a bumblebee of just the right size and weight can land on the platform and cause the flower to open, so only this bee gets the nectar. The flower won’t open for other bee species or other insects that are too small or too large.

Use the examples from the lecture to explain the concept of coevolution.

Listen to a conversation between a student and a professor.

M: Hi, Professor Hogan, do you have a minute?

W: Of course, Dustin. What can I do for you?

M: I have trouble remembering the material from class. When I listen to your lectures, I understand everything, but then I always forget it during the tests.

W: Do you take notes in class?

M: Yes, but sometimes I can’t understand my notes when I look at them later.

W: Hmm. I can suggest a couple of things. First, you should review your lecture notes as soon as possible after class, when the material is still fresh in your mind. Our class ends at noon. If you can, look over your notes while you’re eating lunch. That’s a good time to underline things, and make notes to yourself about things to look up later or ask about in class.

M: Okay.

W: And the other thing is to get enough sleep. Take a short nap, not in class, but after you’ve been studying for a few hours.

M: But won’t I forget what I just studied?

W: Believe it or not, sleeping helps you remember what you just studied. So, it’s a good idea to study in the evening and then get a good night’s sleep.

The speakers discuss possible solutions to the man’s problem. Briefly describe the problem. Then state which solution you prefer and explain why.

Now listen to part of a lecture in a marketing class.

Manufacturers choose different ways to present their goods for sale. The three main ways of selling goods are direct sales, retail sales, and wholesaling.

Direct sales take place away from a store. Direct sales usually take place in the customer’s home, although sometimes it’s in a business setting. Direct sales include the activities of door–to–door salespeople and real estate agents. Other examples are catalog shopping, telemarketing, and at–home Internet shopping.

The second type of sales—retail sales—take place in stores. Department stores, discount chains, supermarkets, hardware stores, car dealerships, drugstores, convenience stores—all of these are retail stores, where consumers directly purchase small quantities of goods. Most manufacturers choose to sell their products through retail stores because they’re a convenient way for consumers to buy. Consumers can inspect merchandise and take their purchases with them. They can exchange or return things easily. They can ask sales clerks for advice about products, or about how something works.

The third type of sales is wholesaling—where goods are sold below the retail or direct–sale price. Wholesale prices are lower because customers are buying in large quantities or in a low overhead setting. Wholesalers operate in a variety of ways. Some have their own outlet stores where they sell directly to consumers. Others send sales representatives to retail stores that buy goods at wholesale prices and then mark them up for resale. Because it’s difficult for a manufacturer to contact every buyer directly, wholesaling is the most practical method for the widespread distribution of goods.

Using points and examples from the lecture, explain the three main ways that manufacturers sell goods to consumers.



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